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Suessa, ae, f., = Σύεσσα.

I. A city of Latium, five miles south of the Liris and eight from the sea, founded B. C. 337 by the Aurunci, and afterwards made their capital. It was often called Suessa Aurunca, now Sessa, Liv. 8, 15; 9, 28; Vell. 1, 14; Liv. 27, 9; 29, 15; Cic. Phil. 3, 4, 10; 4, 2, 4; 13, 8, 18; it was the birthplace of the satiric poet Lucilius, cf. Juv. 1, 20; Aus. Ep. 15, 9.—

II. A very ancient city of Latium, a colony of Alba, conquered by Tarquinius Superbus, usually called Suessa Pometia. It was destroyed by Spurius Cassius, B. C. 502, and its site is unknown, Liv. 1, 41; 1, 53; 2, 16 sq.; cf. Verg. A. 6, 775; Cic. Rep. 2, 24, 44; Sil. 8, 400; Aus. Ep. 15, 9; Plin. 3, 5, 9, 63; 7, 16, 15, 69. — Hence, Suessānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Suessa, Suessan: in Suessano, in the Suessan territories, Cato, R. R. 22, 3.—Plur.: Suessā-ni, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Suessa (Aurunca), Inscr. Grut. 151, 3; 262, 7.