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auris (abl., aure, auri), is, f. [v. audio].

I. Lit., the ear as the organ of hearing, while auricula is the external ear, τὸ οὖς, Enn. ap. Non. p. 506, 1; Cato, R. R. 157, 16; Lucr. 4, 486; Plaut. Pers. 4, 9, 11; Vulg. Eccl. 1, 8; v. antestor.—In comic style: Face, sis, vocivas aedīs aurium, make the chambers of your ears vacant, Plaut. Ps. 1, 5, 52; cf. aedes.—Hence (usu. plur., aures): adhibere, to be attentive, to listen to, Plaut. Cas. 2, 8, 41; Cic. Arch. 3, 5: arrigere, Ter. And. 5, 4, 30; Verg. A. 1, 152: erigere, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 3; id. Sull. 11: admovere aurem, Ter. Phorm. 5, 6, 28; Cic. de Or. 2, 36, 153: dare, to lend an ear, listen, id. Att. 1, 4; Sen. Hippol. 413; Val. Fl. 7, 419: dederet, Cic. Arch. 10, 26: applicare, Hor. C. 3, 11, 8; id. C. S. 72: praebere aures, Liv 38, 52, 11; 40, 8, 3: praebuimus longis ambagibus aures, Ov. M. 3, 692; 5, 334; 6, 1; 15, 465; and: praebere aurem (esp. in the signif., to incline the ears in order to hear, to listen to), Ov. M. 7, 821; Plin. Ep. 2, 14, 8; Suet. Calig. 22; Hor. S. 1, 1, 22; Prop. 3, 14, 15; Vulg. Job, 6, 28 al.; so, inclinare aurem, ib. 4 Reg. 19, 16; ib. Psa. 30, 3: auribus accipere, i. e. to hear, Plaut. Trin. 4, 1, 9; Ter. Hec. 3, 3, 3; Lucr. 4, 982; 6, 164; Cic. de Or 1, 50, 218; Ov. M. 10, 62 al.: auribus percipite, Vulg. Judith, 5, 3; ib. Psa. 16, 2: te cupidā captat aure maritus, Cat. 61, 54; so, auribus aëra captat, Verg. A. 3, 514: auribus haurire, Ov. M. 13, 787; 14, 309: bibere aure, Hor. C. 2, 13, 32 al.: obtundere, Plaut. Cist. 1, 1, 120: tundere, id. Poen. 1, 3, 25: lacessere, Lucr. 4, 597: tergere, id. 6, 119: allicere, id. 6, 183: ferire, Cic. de Or. 2, 84, 344: implere, Tac. H. 1, 90 et saep.—Particular phrases: in or ad aurem, also in aure, dicere, admonere, etc., to say something in the ear, softly or in secret, to whisper in the ear: in aurem Pontius, Scipio, inquit, vide quid agas, Cic. Fragm. ap. Macr. S. 3, 12; so Hor. S. 1, 9, 9; Mart. 1, 90; Petr. 28, 5: ut Voluptati ministrarent et eam tantum ad aurem admonerent, Cic. Fin. 2, 21, 69: in aure dictare, Juv 11, 59: aurem vellere, to pull, as an admonition: Cynthius aurem Vellit et admonuit, i. e. admonished, reminded, Verg. E. 6, 3; so, pervellere, Sen. Ben. 4, 36; id. Ep. 94: dare or servire auribus, to gratify the ears, to flatter, Treb. ap. Cic. Fam. 12, 16; Caes. B. C. 2, 27: in utramvis or in dextram aurem dormire, to sleep soundly, i. e. to be unconcerned, Ter. Heaut. 2, 3, 101 (cf. Menaud. ap. Gell. 2, 23: ̓Επ̓ἀμφοτέραν... μέλλει καθευδήσειν); Plaut. Ps. 1, 1, 122; Plin. Ep. 4, 29: aures alicujus aperire (eccl. Lat., after the Heb.), to open one's ears, i. e. to restore his hearing, Vulg. Marc. 7, 35.—

II. Meton.

A.

(a). The hearing, so far as it judges of the euphony of a discourse: offendent aures, quarum est judicium superbissimum, Cic. Or. 44, 150; so Auct. ad Her. 4, 23, 32: Atticorum aures teretes et religiosae, Cic. Or. 9, 27; so id. Brut. 32, 124; id. Font. 6; Hor. A. P. 387.—

(b). Hearers, auditors: Cum tibi sol tepidus plures admoverit aures, Hor. Ep. 1, 20, 19.—

B. Also, from its shape, the ear of a plough, the mould- or earthboard by which the furrow is widened and the earth turned back, Verg. G. 1, 172; cf. Voss ad h. 1.; Smith, Dict. Antiq., and Pall. 1, 43.