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canthărus, i, m., = κάνθαρος.

I. Lit., a large, wide-bellied drinking-vessel with handles, a tankard, pot (very frequent in Plaut.), Plaut. As. 5, 2, 56; id. Bacch. 1, 1, 36; id. Men. 1, 2, 64; 1, 3, 5; id. Most. 1, 4, 33; id. Ps. 4, 2, 2; 4, 4, 13; 5, 1, 34; id. Pers. 5, 2, 22; 5, 2, 40; id. Rud. 5, 2, 32; id. Stich. 5, 4, 23; 5, 4, 48; Hor. C. 1, 20, 2; id. Ep. 1, 5, 23 al.—Esp. used by Bacchus and his followers, as scyphus, by Hercules, Verg. E. 6, 17 Voss; Macr. S. 5, 21, 14; Arn. 6, 25. —Hence Marius was reproached, because, after the conquest of the Cimbri, he drank from the cantharus like a triumphing Bacchus, Plin. 33, 11, 53, 150; Val. Max. 3, 6, n. 6.—Gr. acc. cantharon, Nemes. Ecl. 3, 48. —

II. Transf.

A. A water-pipe, Dig. 30, 41, 11; Inscr. Grut. 182, 2.—

B. In eccl. Lat., a vessel of holy water, Paul. Nol. 37, 150 (v. Quicherat ad loc.).—

C. A kind of sea-fish, Ov. Hal. 103; Plin. 32, 11, 53, 146; Col. 8, 7, 14.—

D. A black spot or wart under the tongue of the Egyptian Apis, Plin. 8, 46, 71, 184.