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con-sanguĭnĕus, a, um (gen. plur. consanguineūm, Lucr. 3, 73), adj., springing from the same blood, related by blood.

I. In a restricted sense, of brothers and sisters, brotherly, sisterly (so mostly poet.): umbrae, Ov. M. 8, 476: turba, id. H. 14, 121: scelus, Stat. Th. 11, 407: angues, i. e. born with her, kindred, id. ib. 11, 61: acies, Claud. in Rufin. 2, 237.—Of animals: arietes, Att. ap. Cic. Div. 1, 22, 44 (Praetext. v. 21 Rib.). —Of abstract subjects: caritas ( = benevolentia fraterna), Val. Max. 5, 5, 3; cf. scelus, Stat. Th. 11, 407.—Subst.: consanguĭnĕ-us, i, m., a brother, Cic. Att. 2, 23, 3; and consanguĭnĕa, ae, f., a sister, Cat. 64, 118. —

II. In a more gen. sense, related, kindred: homines, Caes. B. C. 1, 74: Turnus, Verg. A. 7, 366: Roma, Sil. 1, 608: dextra, id. 1, 655. —Esp. freq. as subst. plur.: consanguĭ-nĕi, ōrum, kindred, relations, Plaut. Poen. 5, 2, 77; Cic. Inv. 1, 24, 35; Caes. B. G. 1, 11; 1, 33; Suet. Caes. 81; id. Claud. 25.—General senses, related, kindred (so most freq. in prose and poetry), Lucr. 3, 73; 6, 1282; cf. Dig. 38, 16, 1.—

2. Poet., transf.: consanguineus Leti Sopor, Verg. A. 6, 278 (in acc. with Hom. Il. ξ, 231: ὕΠνος κασίγνητος Θανάτοιο).—

B. Trop.: res rustica proxima et quasi consanguinea sapientiae, Col. 1, prooem. 4.