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damnum (late Lat. sometimes dampnum), i, n. [for daminum, neut. of old Part. of dare, = τὸ διδόμενον, v. Ritschl, Opusc. Phil. 2, 709 sq. Less correctly regarded as akin to δαπάνη. Cf. Varr. L. L. 5, 176 Müll.; Dig. 39, 2, 3], hurt, harm, damage, injury, loss; opp. to lucrum (syn. jactura, detrimentum, incommodum, dispendium. Freq. and class.).

I. In gen.: hauscit, hoc paullum lucri quantum ei damni adportet, Ter. Heaut. 4, 4, 25; cf.: si in maximis lucris paullum aliquid damni contraxerit, Cic. Fin. 5, 30, 91; id. Verr. 2, 1, 12 (with dedecus, as in Plaut. Bac. 1, 1, 37; Sall. J. 31, 19; Hor. S. 1, 2, 52; 2, 2, 96 et saep.); Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 13; id. Phil. 2, 27, 67; Hor. S. 2, 3, 300; id. Ep. 1, 7, 88 et saep.: propter damna aut detrimenta aliquos miseros esse, Cic. Leg. 1, 19, 51; so with detrimenta, id. Verr. 2, 3, 98; with jactura, id. Agr. 1, 7, 21: duarum cohortium damno exercitum reducere, Caes. B. G. 6, 44; cf. Tac. A. 1, 71; id. H. 2, 66; Curt. 8, 4; Frontin. Strat. 2, 5, 31 fin.: damnum dare alicui, to inflict upon one (ante-classical), Cato R. R. 149 (twice); Plaut. Cist. 1, 1, 108; id. Truc. 2, 1, 17; Ter. Andr. 1, 1, 116: facere, to suffer, sustain, Plaut. Capt. 2, 2, 77 (opp. lucrum); Cic. Brut. 33; id. Fam. 7, 33; 10, 28, 3 al.; but also, to inflict a penalty, Dig. 9, 2, 30, 3; Ov. Fast. 5, 311: capere, Dig. 9, 2, 39; and in the alliterative passage: in palaestram, ubi damnis desudascitur, Ubi pro disco damnum capiam, Plaut. Bac. 1, 1, 34: accipere, Hor. Ep. 1, 10, 28; Dig. 39, 2, 25: pati, to suffer harm, Sen. Ira, 1, 2; Dig. 9, 2, 29 (but damnum pati, also, to permit, put up with harm, Liv. 22, 41, 4; Luc. 8, 750): ferre (a favorite expression of Ovid), Ov. H. 15, 64; id. F. 1, 60; 2, 522; id. Tr. 3, 8, 34 al.: contrahere (of disease), id. Pont. 1, 10, 29 et saep.: pervenit ad miseros damno graviore colonos Pestis, id. M. 7, 552; cf. id. ib. 3, 213; 8, 777: damna tamen celeres reparant caelestia lunae, i. e. of the waning of the moon, Hor. Od. 4, 7, 13: naturae damnum, natural defect, Liv. 7, 4 fin. —Prov.: damnum appellandum est cum mala fama lucrum, Pub. Syr. 135 (Ribb.).—

B. Transf., of persons: hoc ad damnum (i. e. scortum) deferetur, Plaut. Men. 1, 2, 24: cf. ib. 21 and 60; Ov. M. 11, 381; 12, 16; cf. id. ib. 11, 133.

II. Esp. in law.

A. A fine, mulct, penalty, Plaut. Trin. 1, 2, 182; Liv. 4, 53, 7; 7, 4, 2; Gell. 20, 1, 32: quis umquam tanto damno senatorem coegit? Cic. Phil. 1, 5 fin.: eos (leges) morte, exsilio, vinclis, damno coercent, id. Off. 3, 5, 23.—

B. Freq. in the terms,

1. damnum injuria (datum), i. e. an injury done to another's beast or slave, for which the lex Aquilia provided compensation, (Caesulenus senex) cum ab Sabellio multam lege Aquilia damni injuria petivisset, Cic. Brut. 34, 131; id. Tull. 4, 8; 5, 11; 17, 41.—

2. Damnum infectum, an injury not done but threatened, and against which the person endangered might require security, Cic. Top. 4, 22; Dig. 39, 2, 3; Plin. 36, 2, 2, 6 (cf. infectus).