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dĕcŭrĭa, ae, f. [decem, after the analogy of centuria, from centum], a division consisting of ten, a company of ten, a tithing: decuria, decade, Gr. δεκάς (cf. Eng. dozen). Thus Romulus, acc. to Dion. Hal. 2, 7, p. 82 d, formed out of the thirty curiae 300 δεκάδας (gentes), v. 2. decurio init. So, too, in agriculture: classes etiam non majores quam denum hominum faciundae, quas decurias appellaverunt antiqui, Col. 1, 9, 7; cf. Gell. 18, 7; Sen. Ep. 47, 7; Vitr. 7, 1, 3. Of things: pellium tentoriarum, Valerian. ap. Trebell. Claud. 14.—

II. In gen. (cf. centuria), a division, company, class, most freq. of the decuriae of the judges (three, till the time of Augustus, who added a fourth, and Caligula a fifth), Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 32 fin.; id. Phil. 1, 8; 13, 2, 3; id. Clu. 37, 103; Suet. Aug. 32; id. Calig. 16; Quint. 4, 2, 45; Inscr. Orell. 3877; 3155 sq. al.: equitum, Suet. Tib. 41: scribarum, id. Claud. 1; cf. Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 79: VIATORIA, Inscr. Orell. 4076; 2204 al. Said jocosely of a party of boon companions, association, club, Plaut. Pers. 1, 3, 62; Caecil. ap. Non. 139, 19 (Com. 15 Ribb.).