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dē-fungor, functus (infin. pass. parag. defungier, Ter. Phorm. 5, 9, 32), 3, v. dep., to have done with, to acquit one's self of, to discharge an affair or an obligation (esp. an unwelcome, unpleasant one), to perform, finish (class.).

(a). With abl.: aliquo studio, Lucr. 4, 963: tam vili munere orationis, Planc. ap. Cic. Fam. 10, 24: omni populari concitatione, Cic. Sest. 34, 74: periculis, id. Rosc. Am. 8; Verg. A. 6, 83: tribus decumis pro una, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 16: hoc mendacio, Cael. ap. Cic. Fam. 8, 1 fin.: imperio regis, Liv. 1, 4: proelio, id. 1, 25; cf. bello, id. 25, 35: consulis fato, id. 10, 29; cf.: fatalibus malis, Suet. Ner. 40: plurimorum morbis, perpaucis funeribus, Liv. 4, 52: poena, id. 2, 35; 29, 21: laboribus, Hor. Od. 3, 24, 15; Ov. F. 6, 541 et saep.; esp. of the finishing of this (troublesome) life (poet. and in post-Aug. prose): vitā, to die, Verg. G. 4, 475; id. A. 6, 306; Curt. 5, 5, 13: suis temporibus, Hor. Ep. 2, 1, 22; but, sua morte, Suet. Caes. 89: honesta morte, Curt. 5, 25, 11; 8, 7, 5: terrā, Ov. M. 9, 254; cf. the foll. —Poet., with inanimate subjects: defunctum bello barbiton, discharged from the warfare of love, Hor. Od. 3, 26, 3.—

(b). Absol.: nec adversus illos mercede defungor, nor do I discharge my obligation by the payment, Sen. Ben. 6, 16, 1: defunctus jam sum, now I am quit, i. e. safe, out of danger, Ter. Eun. prol. 15 Ruhnk.; cf. id. Ad. 3, 4, 63; id. Phorm. 5, 8, 32; Ov. M. 2, 9, 24.—To depart, die (not ante Aug.; cf. supra): dicitur prius esse defunctus, Quint. 5, 5, 2; Tac. A. 15, 22 fin.; Suet. Aug. 99: honesta morte, Curt. 5, 8, 11; hence, defunctus, = mortuus, deceased, defunct, Ov. Am. 1, 8, 108; Tac. A. 1, 1; 1, 7; Quint. 4, 1, 28; 5, 14, 15; Suet. Caes. 6; id. Aug. 8; 61; Vulg. Matth. 9. 18.—Plur.: defuncti, m., the dead, Sen. ad. Marc. 13, 2; id. Polyb. 9, 2; id. Ep. 63, 5; Plin. 2, 7, 5, 27; 2, 68, 68, 175 al. et saep.