Previous: ductitoNext: ductor


ducto, āvi, ātum, 1, v. freq. a. [id.], to lead or draw, conduct (very freq. in Plaut.; elsewh. perh. only in Ter., Sall., and once in Tac.; not in Cic., Caes., or the Aug. authors).

I. Lit.

A. In gen.: aliquem, Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 158: restim ductans, Ter. Ad. 4, 7, 34 Ruhnk.: exercitum per saltuosa loca, Sall. J. 38, 1; so, exercitum, id. C. 11, 5; 17, 7; id. J. 70, 2; Tac. H. 2, 100; cf.: equites in exercitu, Sall. C. 19, 3; Amm. 14, 10, 11 (acc. to Quint. 8, 3, 44, this phraseology was regarded by many as indelicate, prob. on account of the foll. signif. of the word ducto).—

B. In partic.: aliquam, to take home, take to one's self a concubine, Plaut. As. 1, 3, 12 sq.; id. Men. 4, 3, 20; id. Poen. 4, 2, 46; Ter. Phorm. 3, 2, 15.—

II. Trop.

A. To deceive, delude, cheat: nil moror ductarier, Plaut. Most. 3, 2, 159: qui me ductavit dolis, id. Capt. 3, 4, 109.—

B. To charm, allure: set me Apollo ipsus delectat ductat Delficus, Enn. ap. Non. 97, 32 (Trag. v. 390 Vahl.): meretrices eum labiis ductant, id. Mil. 2, 1, 15.—(But in Plaut. Pers. 4, 4, 85, the correct reading is duco, not ducto, v. Ritschl ad h. l.).