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infernus, a, um, adj. [infer], lower, that which lies beneath (mostly poet. and postAug.).

I. In gen.: hic sese infernis de partibus erigit Hydra, from beneath, Cic. poët. N. D. 2, 44, 114: superi infernique Di, Liv. 24, 38, 8: stagna, id. 8, 24, 3: auster, Plin. 2, 47, 48, 128: mare, the Tuscan Sea, Luc. 2, 400.—

II. In partic., underground, belonging to the Lower Regions, infernal: rex, Pluto, Verg. A. 6, 106: Juno, Proserpine, id. ib. 6, 138: sedes, id. ib. 8, 244: tenebrae, id. ib. 7, 325: infernas umbras carminibus elicere, to raise the dead by magical incantations, Tac. A. 2, 28: palus, the Styx, Ov. F. 2, 610: ratis, Charon's boat, Prop. 3, 5, 14 (4, 4, 14 Müll. infernas rates): rota, Ixion's wheel, id. 1, 9, 20: sorores, the Furies, Claud. ap. Ruf. 1, 27: aspectus, Tac. G. 43.—

B. Substt.

1. infernum, i, n., the depths of the earth: ex inferno audiri, Jul. Obseq. 105 al.

2. infernus, i, m., hell (eccl. Lat.), Ambros. in Psa. 48, 22, 24; Vulg. Job, 17, 13; id. Psa. 9, 18. —

3. inferni, ōrum, m., the shades below: Theseus infernis, superis testatur Achilles, Prop. 2, 1, 37; 2, 28, 49.—

4. inferna, ōrum, n.

a. The lower parts of the body, the abdomen, Plin. 25, 5, 21, 51.—

b. The infernal regions, Tac. H. 5, 5; Sol. 43, 2; Sen. Herc. Fur. 428.—In eccl. Lat. = infernus, hell, Lact. 6, 3, 11; Vulg. Job, 21, 13. —Hence, adv.: infernĕ, below, beneath (a favorite word of Lucr.), Lucr. 6, 597 (opp. superne); id. 6, 764; 187.