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in-sīdo, sēdi (perf. insidi, Amm. 28, 6, 4), sessum, 3, v. n. and a., to sit down in or on, to settle on; constr. with dat. (poet. and post-Aug.).

I. Lit.

A. In gen.: apes floribus insidunt, Verg. A. 6, 708: inscia Dido, Insidat quantus miserae deus, id. ib. 1, 719; volucres metuunt insidere ramis, Luc. 3, 407. — With acc.: locum, Stat. Th. 2, 151: apex insiditur astris, id. ib. 2, 36: littera "i" sibi insidit, coniicit enim est ab illo jacit, coalesces, Quint. 1, 4, 11: digitos membris, sink into, Ov. M. 10, 257.—

B. In partic., to occupy, keep possession of a place.

(a). With dat.: iniquis silvis, Verg. A. 11, 531.—

(b). With acc.: tumulos, Liv. 8, 24: Aventinum, id. 9, 34: viam, id. 21, 34: arcem, id. 26, 44: collem, Flor. 3, 23: ad itinera insidenda, Liv. 24, 31: fauces, id. 35, 11: saltus ab hoste insessus, id. 7, 34: montes insessi, Tac. A. 13, 39: quo jugum melius aptum cervicibus insidat, may sit more closely on, Col. 2, 22, 2.—

II. Trop., to be fixed, remain, be rooted in, adhere to: in memoria, Cic. de Or. 2, 28: insedit in animo oratio, id. Tusc. 2, 4: tibi insedisset suspicio, id. Mil. 25: macula insedit in nomine, id. de Imp. Pomp. 3: dum illa verba memoriae insidant, settle, i. e. remain fixed or rooted in the memory, Quint. 10, 7, 2.