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ob-sĕquor, cūtus (quutus), 3, v. dep.

I. Lit., to accommodate one's self to the will of a person; to comply with, yield to, gratify, humor, submit to; with dat. of the pers. or thing (freq. and class.; syn.: morigeror, obtempero, pareo, oboedio), Cato, R. R. 5: cum huic obsecutus sis, illi est repugnandum, Cic. Tusc. 5, 20, 60; id. Clu. 54, 149; id. Q. Fr. 1, 1, 11, 32: voluntati alicujus, id. Fin. 2, 6, 17: imperio, Juv. 10, 343. —

(b). With acc. of the thing (ante- and post-class.): et id ego percupio obsequi gnato meo, in this, Plaut. As. 1, 1, 61: ea, Gell. 2, 7, 13.—

II. Transf.

A. To yield to, give one's self up to, indulge in a thing: amori, Plaut. Trin. 2, 1, 8: studiis suis, Nep. Att. 2: fortunae, Caes. ap. Cic. Att. 10, 8, 1: pudori, Cic. Fam. 16, 9: tempestati, id. ib. 1, 9, 21: est lubido homini suo animo opsequi, Plaut. Bacch. 3, 3, 12: animo, to follow one's inclinations, id. Mil. 3, 1, 83; id. Ps. 5, 1, 26: irae, Curt. 5, 8, 12.—

B. Of inanimate things, to be yielding, pliant, ductile: aes regulare malleis obsequitur, Plin. 34, 8, 20, 94.—Impers. pass.: volo amori obsecutum illius, Plaut. As. 1, 1, 62 (v. Lachm. Lucr. p. 304).—Hence, obsĕ-quens, entis, P. a. (separate, vin' tu te mihi ob esse sequentem an nevis? Plaut. Merc. 1, 2, 39).

A. In gen., yielding, compliant, obsequious: opsequens oboediensque est mori atque inperiis patris, Plaut. Bacch. 3, 3, 55: patri, Ter. Heaut. 2, 3, 18: legiones nobis, Cic. Fam. 10, 8.—Comp.: animus obsequentior, Sen. Ep. 50, 6; Curt. 6, 3, 18.— Sup.: curae mortalium obsequentissimam esse Italiam, amenable, susceptible of culture, Col. 3, 8, 5: nurus, Quint. Decl. 291. —

B. In partic., an appellation of the gods, favorable, indulgent, gracious, propitious: bonam atque obsequentem deam, Plaut. Rud. 1, 5, 3.—Esp. as subst., of Fortuna: Quem te deum autem nominem? Leo. Fortunam atque obsequentem, Plaut. As. 3, 3, 126; Inscr. Orell. 1750; 1751.— Hence, adv.: obsĕquenter, compliantly, obsequiously (perh. not in Cic.): haec a collegā obsequenter facta, Liv. 41, 10, 12: parere alicui, Plin. Ep. 4, 11, 15.—Sup.: vixit in contubernio aviae severissime, et tamen obsequentissime, entirely according to her wishes, Plin. Ep. 7, 24, 3.