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pātro, āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. [etym. dub.; prob. from root pat- of pateo, q. v.; cf. Gr. πατος], to bring to pass, execute, perform, achieve, accomplish, bring about, effect, finish, conclude (rarely used by Cic., by Cæs. not at all; syn.: conficio, perago, perpetro).

I. In gen.: ubi sementim patraveris, Cato, R. R. 54: conata, Lucr. 5, 385: operibus patratis, Cic. Leg. 2, 8, 19: promissa, id. Att. 1, 14, 7: bellum, to bring the war to an end, Sall. J. 75, 2; Vell. 2, 79, 3; 123; Tac. A. 2, 26; Flor. 2, 15, 1; cf. Quint. 8, 3, 44: incepta, Sall. J. 70, 5: facinus, id. C. 18, 8; Liv. 23, 8 fin.: consilia, Sall. J 13, 5: cuncta, id. C. 53, 4: pacem, to conclude a peace, Liv. 44, 25: jusjurandum, as pater patratus (v. infra), to pronounce the customary form of oath in making a treaty, id. 1, 24, 6: jussa, to execute, Tac. H. 4, 83: patrata victoria, obtained, gained, id. A. 13, 41 fin.: patrati remedii gloria, the glory of the effected cure, id. H. 4, 81 multas mortes jussu Messalinae patratas, id. A. 11, 28.—

II. In partic., in mal. part.: patranti fractus ocello. i. e. with a lascivious eye, Pers. 1, 18: sunt lusci oculi atque patrantes, Anthol. Lat. 3, 160, 3. (Cf., respecting the accessory notion of patrare, Quint. 8, 3, 44.)—Part. perf.: pātrātus, act. (as if from patror, āri), in the phrase pater patratus, the fetial priest, who ratified a treaty with religious rites: pater patratus ad jusjurandum patrandum, id est sanciendum fit foedus, Liv 1, 24, 6; cf. Serv. ad Verg. A. 9, 53; 10, 14; 12, 206.