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pōcŭlum (contr. pōclum, Plaut. Curc. 2, 3, 80; 89; Arn. 5, 175), i, n. [from root po-, pot; Gr. πίνω, v. potus].

I. Lit., a drinking-vessel, a cup, goblet, bowl, beaker (class.; syn.: calix, cyathus): et nobis idem Alcimedon duo pocula fecit, Verg. E: 3, 44: poculum grande, Plaut. Curc. 2, 3, 89: magnis poculis aliquem invitare, id. Rud. 2, 3, 32: exhaurire poculum, to empty, Cic. Clu. 11, 31; so, ducere, Hor. C. 1, 17, 21: siccare, Petr. 92: poscunt majoribus poculis (sc. bibere), out of goblets, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 26, 66: stans extra poculum caper, i.e. in relief, Juv. 1, 76; cf. id. 5, 43.—Prov.: eodem poculo bibere, i. e. to undergo the same sufferings, Plaut. Cas. 5, 2, 52.—

II. Transf.

A. A drink, draught, potion (mostly poet.): si semel poculum amoris accepit meri, Plaut. Truc. 1, 1, 22: salsa pocula, sea-water, id. Rud. 2, 7, 31: pocula sunt fontes liquidi, Verg. G. 3, 529: amoris poculum, i. e. a philter, Hor. Epod. 5, 38; also, desiderii, id. ib. 17, 80: prae poculis nescientes, through drunkenness, Flor. 2, 10, 2: pocula praegustare, Juv. 6, 633: poculum ex vino, Vulg. Cant. 8, 2.—

B. A drinking-bout, a carouse (class.): in ipsis tuis immanibus poculis, Cic. Phil. 2, 25, 63; cf.: is sermo, qui more majorum a summo adhibetur in poculis, while drinking, id. Sen. 14, 46.—

C. A draught of poison, alicui poculum dare, Cic. Clu. 10, 30; Ov. M. 14, 295; Val. Fl. 2, 155.