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stŏla, ae, f., = στολή, a long upper garment.

I. Orig., as with the Greeks, worn by any one: squalidā saeptus stolā, Enn. ap. Non. 537, 27 (Trag. v. 373 Vahl.); Ov. F. 6, 654: saeptus mendici stolā, Enn. ap. Non. 537, 28 (Trag. v. 372 Vahl.): lugubri stolā succincta, id. ib. 198, 4 (Trag. v. 134 id.); so, muliebris, Varr. ib. 537, 29 sq.

II. Later, with the Romans, in partic.,

A. Lit., a long female upper garment, worn by the Roman matrons, and reaching from the neck to the ankles, a robe, gown, stole (cf. palla): vestimenta muliebria ... veluti stolae, pallia, tunicae, etc., Dig. 34, 2, 23; cf.: vir fortis stolam indutus, Sen. Vit. Beat. 13, 3: (Dianae) erat admodum amplum signum cum stolā, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 34, 74: ad talos stola demissa, Hor. S. 1, 2, 99; Ov. P. 3, 3, 52; cf. id. Tr. 2, 252; Mart. 3, 93, 4; 10, 5, 1; Auct. Priap. 12, 11: tamquam stolam dedisset, in matrimonio conlocavit, Cic. Phil. 2, 18, 44.—Hence, also, of the dress of a voluptuary, Hor. S. 1, 2, 71; of a cithern-player, Varr. R. R. 3, 13, 3; Ov. F. 6, 654; of the priests of Isis, App. M. 11, p. 269, 5.—

B. Transf., a noble woman, lady, dame, matron: hic eques, hic juvenum coetu stola mixta laborat, Stat. S. 1, 2, 235; Plin. 33, 3, 12, 140; Val. Max. 2, 1, 5. —

III. In eccl. Lat., a royal robe, Vulg. 1 Par. 15, 27.—

2. Of the Jewish priests, Vulg. 2 Macc. 3, 15.—

3. A dress of ceremony, Vulg. Luc. 20, 46.