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tŏga, ae, f. [tego], a covering, garment.

I. In gen. (ante-class. and rare): praeterea quod in lecto togas ante habebant; ante enim olim fuit commune vestimentum et diurnum et nocturnum et muliebre et virile, Varr. ap. Non. 541, 2: incinctā togā, Afran. ib. 540, 33; cf. comic.: ne toga cordylis, ne paenula desit olivis, Mart. 13, 1, 1. —

B. A roofing, roof: (toga) dicitur et tectum, Non. 406, 21. —

II. In partic., the outer garment of a Roman citizen in time of peace, long, broad, and flowing, and consisting of a single piece of stuff; the toga or gown.

A. Lit.: sed quod pacis est insigne et otii toga, Cic. Pis. 30, 73: quem tenues decuere togae, Hor. Ep. 1, 14, 32: ima, Quint. 11, 3, 139: pexa, Mart. 2, 44, 1: rasa, id. 2, 88, 4: toga praetexta, the toga of magistrates and free-born children, ornamented with purple; v. praetexo: toga pura, the unornamented toga of youth who had laid aside the praetexta: Ciceroni meo togam puram cum dare Arpini vellem, Cic. Att. 9, 6, 1; 5, 20, 9; 7, 8, 5; called more freq. virilis, id. Sest. 69, 144; id. Phil. 2, 18, 44; Liv. 26, 19, 5; Plin. Ep. 1, 9, 2; and: toga libera, Prop. 4 (5), 1, 132; Ov. F. 3, 771; cf.: a patre ita eram deductus ad Scaevolam sumptā virili togā, Cic. Lael. 1, 1: toga picta, worn by a victor in his triumph, Liv. 10, 7, 9; 30, 15, 11; Flor. 1, 5, 6: purpurea, worn by kings, Liv. 27, 4, 11; 31, 11, 12: candida, the toga worn by candidates for office, made of white fulled cloth; v. candidus: pulla, the dark-gray toga of mourners; v. pullus; cf. Becker, Gallus, 3, p. 107 sq.; 2, pp. 55 and 74 sq. (2d edit.).—

B. Transf.

1. As a designation for peace: ex quo genere haec sunt, Liberum appellare pro vino, campum pro comitiis, togam pro pace, arma ac tela pro bello, Cic. de Or. 3, 42, 167: cedant arma togae, id. poët. Off. 1, 22, 77; id. Pis. 30, 73: vir omnibus belli ac togae dotibus eminens, Vell. 1, 12, 3; Tert. Pall. 5.—Also of the Roman national character; hence, togae oblitus, forgetful of Rome, Hor. C. 3, 5, 10.—

2. As, in the times of the emperors, the toga went more and more out of use, and became almost exclusively the garment of clients, poet. for a client: eheu quam fatuae sunt tibi Roma togae, Mart. 10, 18, 4; 10, 47, 5; cf. Plin. Pan. 65; Flor. 4, 12, 32. —

3. As women of loose character were not allowed to wear the proper female garment (the stola), and assumed the toga, poet. for a prostitute: si tibi cura togae est potior pressumque quasillo Scortum, Tib. 4, 10, 3.