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tŏgātus, a, um, adj. [toga], wearing the toga, clad in the toga, gowned: fovebit Romanos, rerum dominos, gentemque togatam, Verg. A. 1, 282: ut togatus mandata senatus audiret, Liv. 3, 26, 9.—

II. Transf., of a private station: sportula turbae rapienda togatae, by the crowd of clients (cf. toga, II. B. 2.), Juv. 1, 96: opera, the service of a client, Mart. 3, 46, 1. — Hence, subst.

A. tŏgātus, i, m., lit., a Roman citizen, opp. to a foreigner or to a Roman soldier: judex modo palliatus modo togatus, Cic. Phil. 5, 5, 14: cui uni togato supplicationem decreverit (senatus), id. Sull. 30, 85: unus e togatorum numero, id. de Or. 1, 24, 111: magna caterva togatorum, id. Rosc. Am. 46, 135: crudelitas in togatos, to Romans, id. Rab. Post. 10, 27: non pudet lictorum vestrorum majorem prope numerum in foro conspici quam togatorum? Liv. 3, 52, 7: inter togatos, Sen. Const. 9, 2; Sall. J. 21, 2.— In the time of the emperors togati seems to have been the designation of the citizens, in opposition to the plebs sordida, the tunicati, the third class, Tac. Or. 6; cf. Roth in Jahn's Neues Jahrb. 1858, vol. 77, p. 286 sq.—

2. (Acc. to toga, II. B. 2.) Under the emperors, a man of humble station, a client, Juv. 7, 142.—

B. tŏgāta, ae, f. (sc. fabula), a species of the Roman drama which treated of Roman subjects, the national drama, Diom. p. 487 P.; Sen. Ep. 8, 7; Hor. A. P. 288; Vell. 2, 9, 3; Cic. Sest. 55, 118; Quint. 10, 1, 100; Suet. Ner. 11; id. Gram. 21; cf. Com. Rel. p. 113 sq. Rib.—

2. (Acc. to toga, II. B. 3.) Togata, of an immodest woman, a prostitute: ancilla, Hor. S. 1, 2, 63; cf. id. ib. 1, 2, 82; Mart. 6, 64, 4.—

III. Esp.: Gallia Togata, the part of Gallia Cisalpina acquired by the Romans on the hither side of the Po, Mel. 2, 4, 2; Plin. 3, 14, 19, 112; Hirt. B. G. 8, 24, 3; 8, 52, 1.